Facebook!

Well, until today I seemed to create new pages for each event. It’s all too much isn’t it? I looked around and realised that with all the social networking and media we are overdosing and no longer noticing what’s really going on.

Hence, one page for my friends who want to know when I burp and where I walk my dogs: Sleam Leamy.

And for those who want to know what I’m writing, what’s been published, and how to find me at book readings and signings, another page. Sarah Leamy.

Not so bad was it? I just have to contact everyone on each page for the three books and let them know. Sigh. A cup of tea in hand, and the woodstove in the background, here I go.

 

Advertisements

Kirkus Review (1/2012)

One man’s journey through crisis, loss and love is captured through his camera lens.

Lucky Phillips has had a rough year—his father is in coma following a stroke, his girlfriend is cheating with his best friend, his beloved dog has gone missing—when he throws his camera and other belongings into his truck and leaves Santa Fe and his troubles behind. Lucky drives through the Midwest, meeting locals and snapping photos, and feeling all the while that he is “just not living up to” his name. His fortunes change when he arrives by chance in Madison, Wis., and is taken in by two university students, Christine and Joanna, who are charmed by his stories, his cooking and his free-spiritedness. He soon finds himself pursued by two women—good-girl Christine and sexy Michaela, who lives next door—and by a local gallery owner who wants to exhibit his photographs. Despite these promising events, Lucky’s past continues to haunt him as he struggles with feelings of guilt and betrayal and risks sabotaging his budding relationship with Christine. Inevitably, he must return to Santa Fe to face his critically ill father and decide how to care for him—and how to say goodbye. As Leamy’s novel comes full circle, Lucky proves to be an endearingly flawed hero, and the glue that holds this meandering narrative together. While Lucky is complex and engaging, one wishes the plot were as taught and focused as Leamy’s prose. But Leamy also demonstrates a talent for examining small moments—cooking dinner, smoking a cigarette—and probing their emotional depths. With its hopeful ending, this tender story of one man’s very human struggles will resonate with readers.

An endearing, ultimately hopeful novel about self-discovery.

Kirkus Review (1/2012)

One man’s journey through crisis, loss and love is captured through his camera lens.

Lucky Phillips has had a rough year—his father is in coma following a stroke, his girlfriend is cheating with his best friend, his beloved dog has gone missing—when he throws his camera and other belongings into his truck and leaves Santa Fe and his troubles behind. Lucky drives through the Midwest, meeting locals and snapping photos, and feeling all the while that he is “just not living up to” his name. His fortunes change when he arrives by chance in Madison, Wis., and is taken in by two university students, Christine and Joanna, who are charmed by his stories, his cooking and his free-spiritedness. He soon finds himself pursued by two women—good-girl Christine and sexy Michaela, who lives next door—and by a local gallery owner who wants to exhibit his photographs. Despite these promising events, Lucky’s past continues to haunt him as he struggles with feelings of guilt and betrayal and risks sabotaging his budding relationship with Christine. Inevitably, he must return to Santa Fe to face his critically ill father and decide how to care for him—and how to say goodbye. As Leamy’s novel comes full circle, Lucky proves to be an endearingly flawed hero, and the glue that holds this meandering narrative together. While Lucky is complex and engaging, one wishes the plot were as taught and focused as Leamy’s prose. But Leamy also demonstrates a talent for examining small moments—cooking dinner, smoking a cigarette—and probing their emotional depths. With its hopeful ending, this tender story of one man’s very human struggles will resonate with readers.

An endearing, ultimately hopeful novel about self-discovery.

Kirkus Indie review 2011

While some may find the subject matter dismal and the novel’s chilly tone depressing, readers who enjoy vulnerable, flawed characters will find themselves engaged by Lucky’s courageous attempts to leave the past behind. Leamy’s writing is solid, but the book’s tendency to abruptly jump between the past and the present can be distracting. Still, readers who have been down on their luck, especially in these difficult economic times, will find themselves sympathizing with Lucky and will ultimately be inspired. For a hefty dose of harsh reality, tempered by the kindness of others, give this book a “shot.”
Kirkus Indie, Kirkus Media

 

 

For the link to all books available:

https://www.amazon.com/author/sarahleamy

 

Sample of a review for LUCKY SHOT

After reviewing Sarah Leamy’s book When No One is Looking for Bookpleasures.com last spring I was very eager to read her new book, Lucky Shot, a Novel of Sex, Death and Photography. I was not disappointed. It is said that a picture is a worth a thousand words and in this novel, the protagonist is a photographer (click). Leamy’s prose is lean, almost stacatto at times, and creates a series of pictures in the mind’s eye of readers. What another writer might need thousands of words to describe, she can describe vividly in far fewer words. Reading her fiction is like viewing a film, you hear the voices, see the facial expressions and body language and feel each character. The style swings along in an easy, engaging rythym, and as a reader I feel like I’m dancing along with the characters to my favorite music.
SANDRA SANCHEZ of Bookpleasures.com

The Right To Die: who decides?

At Bromsgrove North High School, I remember Miss Jones asking us to debate this in class. Without parroting our parents, following political party lines or the rhetoric of the religious right(eous). I remember heated name calling, raging against each other, not the clear compassionate conversation she hoped for.

I don’t remember my thoughts at the time.

Now though is a different matter. I’ve had some intense personal experience with the question. Who decides to take a life? At what point is the machine unplugged and the spirit set free? Or do you see it as murder?
I’ve taken a moment, a question, a memory from my life and I sowed that seed in my protagonist Lucky and watched to see what Lucky would do. It’s not my story but it began with me. Now I ask the readers to let me know what they, you, would do in Lucky’s situation? Run away? Stay? Move into a longterm facility? Call the lawyers or the pope?

It’s not easy, none of it is. Lucky Shot  brings up hard questions for the protagonist but there is also some laughter amongst Lucky’s friends both new and old, there’s a journey across country, desire and the start of new relationships, and throughout Lucky finds a sense of community’s strength to relax into.

The novel hopes to start more open hearted thoughts for this taboo subject, lets talk, lets listen to each other’s stories. It’s not pretty, but death isn’t. It just is part of life. yet no one likes to talk about it and that’s hard, horrendous, when faced with these choices and you’re alone with them.